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Seeking Putter Advice Options
MikeK
Posted: Wednesday, August 08, 2007 8:27:28 AM
Rank: Tree Hukker

Joined: 8/1/2007
Posts: 19
Hey everyone,

I'm still pretty new to the game, and I feel like I mostly understand how the disc weights and plastic types affect drivers (I'll probably realize in about a year that I really don't, but let's pretend I do!), but I'm a little uncertain as to how big of a role they play with putters.

I understand that lighter weights should give me more glide (which translates to more distance), but heavier weights should work better in a headwind. Do most people carry a heavy and a light putter depending on wind and distance?

Then there are the different plastic types. Are their any major advantages/disadvantages to different plastic types when it comes to putters?
bkaplan10
Posted: Wednesday, August 08, 2007 9:13:34 AM
Rank: Extreme Veteran

Joined: 6/2/2003
Posts: 177
Mike, just buy a couple of max weight (175) aviars are become one with AVIAR NATION!
Kool Keith
Posted: Wednesday, August 08, 2007 9:20:29 AM
Rank: Extreme Veteran

Joined: 6/28/2005
Posts: 338
Most people don't really carry drastic weight differences in putters. What I see more of is people using the same putter mold in different plastics and levels of "beatness" to throw different flight patterns. I've got 3 Wizards in the bag, and from 15 feet they all fly the same. But if I throwing a 200 foot or more shot with one, then they get very different. They are all the same mold, and same plastic just beat in different stages. I can go a little left, middle, or way right with these three.

As far as the plastic types go... don't putt with Champion/Z and you are okay. They have a tendency to slide/cut through more than D/Dx/S/X/Pro putters. Past that, its all about your comfort level with what you like - I prefer grippy putters with soft tops and firm rims. Some like rock hard KC Pro Aviars, while others throw the exact same mold in a soft JK Pro plastic.

Once you throw with decent power, you are going to find that almost all putters need to be thrown with hzyer to make them hold up in any wind at all. This isn't a bad thing, it's just one of those tricks that you learn. A great way to get used to this is to go play a couple rounds using nothing but your putter. Try to make it go left, right, try forehands, backhands, hell, even rollers. Guys with power can reach some stable putters (KC Aviars, Wizards, Challengers, Bangers) out to 400 feet. Learning to throw a slow disc with control is something that not everyone can do when they start, but it is a valuable skill to have.

Oh, you also need to understand overstable/stable/understable and how it relates to headwind/no wind/tailwind and throwing hyzer/flat/annie. You could read online to get an understanding, but the best way is to just go out and throw putters.
MikeK
Posted: Thursday, August 09, 2007 6:30:48 AM
Rank: Tree Hukker

Joined: 8/1/2007
Posts: 19
Thanks for the advice (Keith) and the attempted proselytizing (Brian)! I also appreciate the playing-with-only-a-putter advice for learning control in the wind. I'll definitely be giving that a shot in the near future.

I think I may just go out and buy multiple, heavier putters (but not in Champion/Z plastics) and practice with them until I find "the one." That's right, Brian... Aviar Nation is going to have to win my love!

Outside of Champion/Z being potentially bad, do people have a major preference for putter plastic?

Also, some putters I was considering trying were:
The various and sundry Aviars (looks like there are at least 4 of them)
Wizard
Warlock
Magnet (normal and soft)
Putt'r

Anyone have any other recommendations? And does anyone find that list to be redundant? In other words, are there overlaps (for example, maybe a Putt'r in Elite X plays pretty similar to a Soft Magnet)? I know I'll need to throw them for myself to find out for sure, but I'm pretty new to the massive disc selection, and I'm especially new to all things non-Innova, and I really don't want to spend money on 10 different putters right now, so if anyone has any advice to possibly narrow down my selections, I'll take it all into consideration.

Thanks again for helping out this semi-confused novice!
finnhawc
Posted: Thursday, August 09, 2007 6:45:24 AM

Rank: Elite Veteran

Joined: 1/16/2007
Posts: 923
Location: Wyoming
Most folks carry two putters in the same condition and weight just in case they lose one and some other putter(KC Aviar commonly) for driving shorter holes.I recommend going for Max weight for putters the plastic doesn't matter as much if you hit the putt it will stay in(usually). The Champ has great advice @ kenclimo.com-'treat the putt as if you are throwing a very heavy object at the basket.' If, you are just starting than try a flat putter like a Rhyno or a Birdie they help flatten your disc release so you don't throw spike putts that roll. Practice putts from 6-8 feet away until your very comfortable then back up three feet. The biggest mistake I see newbies make is practicing putts outside their range. Mr. Climo thinks long putts(outside 40 feet) are bonus and not going to help your game as much a nailing more putts within 18 feet.
bkaplan10
Posted: Thursday, August 09, 2007 6:53:38 AM
Rank: Extreme Veteran

Joined: 6/2/2003
Posts: 177
MikeK, I have a couple of wizards that you are welcome to try out. PM me if you are interested.
BIGBOY
Posted: Thursday, August 09, 2007 8:17:49 AM
Rank: Veteran

Joined: 7/27/2005
Posts: 288
Mike,

Some things to consider.....stablity and deep dish.

People love aviars for two reasons they fly flat and they do not have a very deep rim. If you don't putt with a lot of pop they will fly straight for a good 20-25 feet. The more pop the straighter they fly........until you pop to much then they fade to the right. Aviars have a fairly smooth release because they are not as deep dish as say a discraft putr. I like to use a discraft challenager because they are very similiar to an aviar but a hair more stable, so they can handle the little extra pop I impart on my disc.

I know a lot of people like the wizard and this summer I have seen a lot of people using them. I have never putted with them myself so I will leave it up to Keith to tell you all about them.

The aviar is a good starting point. I would get two of them and use them for several weeks to months before you chuck it and move on to something else. Give the disc some time. I have many different aviars in various stages of beatness if you want to give them a try, from new to old, big bead to no bead.
NEngle
Posted: Thursday, August 09, 2007 8:50:33 AM

Rank: Elite Veteran

Joined: 11/18/2003
Posts: 944
Location: Fairfield, OH
Aviar Nation!
bobherb
Posted: Thursday, August 09, 2007 11:49:10 AM

Rank: Elite Veteran

Joined: 8/10/2004
Posts: 449
In the past 17 years I have used nearly "all" putters and some discs which are not considered putters too (like the Roc). If you are a confident putter and in a groove, just about any putter will do.
One of the balancing acts a putter must perform is being soft enough to grab chains well, yet be rigid enough to not wobble in your hand during windy conditions. It is not a bad idea to carry a "softer" putter for calm conditions and a separate, rigid putter (or even an approach disc) for windy putts. If you have a putt into a steady breeze you will have more confidence with the rigid putter.
The way a putter feels in your hand is also important. Some have a smooth top and others have a groove for the thumb to sink into on top.
A general tip - Have fun playing and take a break if you get so frustrated you are not enjoying the game.
BIGBOY
Posted: Thursday, August 09, 2007 1:09:10 PM
Rank: Veteran

Joined: 7/27/2005
Posts: 288
Well said Bob. Have some fun. Make your putts and be happy.
MikeK
Posted: Monday, August 13, 2007 8:51:37 AM
Rank: Tree Hukker

Joined: 8/1/2007
Posts: 19
Thanks for all of the advice, guys!

Finn alluded to the Birdie being a good novice putter, and I'm actually currently using a Birdie (DX) for close-mid putts (and a Goblin for mid-long putts).

I do like it, although I seem to have trouble outside of a fairly short range, but I haven't decided if that is because of my putting form or because the disc is just such a slow disc.

I'll be using all of this advice over the next few weeks, and hopefully I can slowly extend my gimme zone.

Thanks again!
-Mike
finnhawc
Posted: Monday, August 13, 2007 9:52:34 AM

Rank: Elite Veteran

Joined: 1/16/2007
Posts: 923
Location: Wyoming
Form most likely-it is sorta common for folks to have different short and long range putters; sometimes, they are the same mold with just different stages of stable (beat-in-ness). Try other folks putters while you play in their group. Hard Magnets are my choice but it is a very personal and spiritual choice for sure... have fun!
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